Now on View: All that Glitters is Glass

Its summertime and that can only mean one thing at FWMoA – lots of glass on display! Through August 4th we have two stunning exhibits of glassworks by artists Tim Tate and Marlene Rose. Now on view are also several new dazzling glass sculptures that join our more permanent glass pieces, including a collection of American Brilliant Cut Glass. Read on to learn how FWMoA acquired this magnificent collection now on view.

Artist on Artist: Tate on Degas

To celebrate Edgar Degas' birthday, Elizabeth Kilmer examines Tim Tate's modern take on Degas' well-known "Little Dancer" sculpture. Read on to learn how artists build on previous artists narratives in this installment of Artist on Artist.

Artists on Artists: Linn on Rodia

Artists are inspired to create by a multitude of things: their environment, their lives, books, movies, and even each other! In this series, we'll be looking at artists who made artworks inspired by other artists and their works. Explore how glass artist Steve Linn was inspired by Simon Rodia's Towers in this post by Children's Education Associate Katy Thompson.

Treasures from the Vault: Ginny Ruffner

A common misconception about working in museums is that you get to touch the stuff, whether artworks or artifacts. When I lead a tour a common question is: “What is the coolest piece of art you’ve gotten to handle?” As an educator, I have to explain, I’m not allowed to touch the stuff either! While my job requires handling of reproductions, I rarely get to to into the vault and see, or write about, the various treasures we have. Read on to see which treasure from the vault caught the eye of our writer!

Art Term Tuesday: Murrini

When you walk into the 46th International Glass Invitational Award Winners exhibition here at FWMoA, it’s likely that your eye will be immediately drawn to a pair of large, brightly-colored pieces standing in one of the gallery’s corners. These works by American glass artist Stephen Powell have playful, enigmatic titles, and, with their size and thinly curved structures, seem to be part-sculpture, part-architectural element.

Art Term Tuesday: Macchia

A trio of vibrant, eye-catching glass sculptures from the FWMoA permanent collection have recently been put on display in the museum's Karl S. and Ella L. Bolander Gallery. These large, multihued vessels--featuring undulating rims and exteriors spotted with bright pops of color--are from renowned studio glass artist Dale Chihuly's Macchia series. Once you've taken in the visual brilliance of these works, though, you may find yourself wondering: What exactly is a "macchia?" It is an Italian word--derived from the Latin macula--that means "stain," "spot," or "speck;" it can also be used in reference to Mediterranean shrubland. (For the coffee lovers out there: Yep, it is also related to the drink called caffè macchiato, which could be translated as "coffee stained or spotted (with milk).") Looking at how these sculptures are "specked" or "stained" with color, it's possible to understand why Chihuly named this series Macchia. But is there anything more to the word beyond this, especially in relation to art history and technique?

Art Term Tuesday: Glass Casting

Opening soon at the Fort Wayne Museum of Art is the 46th Annual International Glass Invitational Award Winners exhibit in which glass sculptures by the best in the world will be on display. These beautiful works of art come into being by many processes, employing techniques that the average person might never have encountered. With that in mind, let’s explore one of the more popular glass making processes: cast glass.