Treasures from the Vault: Tim Tadder

Artists often have a team or collaborate with one another, bringing impactful visions that start conversations or remix old stories with new ideas. One such artist is commercial and editorial photographer Tim Tadder, who collaborated with sculptor Krisztianna to create the Las Muertas photo series.

Artist on Artist: Tate on Degas

To celebrate Edgar Degas' birthday, Elizabeth Kilmer examines Tim Tate's modern take on Degas' well-known "Little Dancer" sculpture. Read on to learn how artists build on previous artists narratives in this installment of Artist on Artist.

Reality Check: Choosing Your Words Wisely

Does it ever strike you that two words, similar as they are, can have strikingly different meanings? When it comes to art, words that are commonly used interchangeably to describe creative work can actually bring us to a fork in the road on the path to meaning. Read on to spend a little time in the geeky world of art words.

Artists on Artists: Linn on Rodia

Artists are inspired to create by a multitude of things: their environment, their lives, books, movies, and even each other! In this series, we'll be looking at artists who made artworks inspired by other artists and their works. Explore how glass artist Steve Linn was inspired by Simon Rodia's Towers in this post by Children's Education Associate Katy Thompson.

Treasures from the Vault: Dale Enochs’s “Double Exposure”

Today’s ‘treasure’ is a little different than others we’ve selected. Dale Enochs’s Double Exposure is set apart from other treasures we’ve featured because they don’t often leave the vault. On the contrary—this sculpture is permanently installed in our atrium! It may seem as though I’m betraying the identity of this blog series, but I ask you this – how often do we become so used to seeing a work of art that we no longer take notice of its presence? My task today is to compel you to give this particular work a second look.

Off the Cuff: The Human behind the Art, Manhattan’s Mercurial Muse Audrey Munson

The history of American art is filled with little-known human stories that I find generally more fascinating than much of the art.  Today, I’m thinking about a young artists’ model, Audrey Munson, whose mercurial rise to fame was as unlikely as her despairing descent into the black void of the rest of her life.

At the golden dawn of the 20th Century, Audrey Munson, an impoverished pre-teenager, caught the eye of photographer Felix Benedict Herzog as she pressed her face against a department store window and soon thereafter became the most famous artists’ model in American history.